A Real (Preliminary) American Roll-Call, Pt 5

So Mark Bellomo’s The Ultimate Guide to G.I. Joe 1982-1994 collects a bunch of Larry Hama’s proposed G.I. Joe character/toy names that didn’t make the cut. Some are neat, some are weird, and I wrote ‘em all in a notebook. Last time, we looked at the releases from 1988 (and before that, 1983 to 1985, 1986, and 1987). For whatever reason, there are no preliminary names listed for 1989, so here’s 1990!

1990

Ambush: Sgt. Hyde, Smokescreen
Bullhorn: Peacemaker, Talkdown, Wingshot, Last-Chance
Cold Front: Big Chill, Cold Wave, Sub-Zero, Perma-Frost, Cold War, Cold Steel
Freefall: Jumpmaster
Major Storm: Major Foray
Pathfinder: Whacker, Bushmaster, Wildfire, Brushfire, Wildwood
Stretcher: Housecall
Topside: Barracuda, Snipe, Marlinspike, Swabbie, Salty Dog
Updraft: Eggbeater

Airborne: Rigger
Altitude: Geronimo!
Skydive: Jump Master

Decimator: Panhead
Metal-Head: Tank-Buster, Tank-Zapper, Squash-Head Harry, Salvo, Heat-Round
Night Creeper: Ghost-Tigers, Brotherhood of the Were-Tigers, Ghost-Dragons
Overlord: Braco Dracommen, Carbo Medmornac
Range-Viper: Bush Viper, Badger, Snake-Eater, Dingo
S.A.W.-Viper: C.L.A.W. (Cobra Light Automatic Weapons)-Viper

… and that’s all for now! My favorite of these is probably “Wildwood”, but it’s a tougher call than some of the other years - “Talkdown,” “Housecall,” and “Heat-Round” are genuinely neat. There are some definite weirdos in this lot, though. “Eggbeater”? “Geronimo!” (with an exclamation point)? “Squash-Head Harry”?!

Historically, the most interesting unused names here are probably Overlord’s. Both are ridiculously transparent anagrams for Cobra Commander, putting the character’s real identity into an entirely new light! (I can’t remember if Bellomo’s book went into that particular topic more, unfortunately…)

Anyway. Be sure to tune in one last time, where we’ll not only wrap this article series up, but learn that Skymate was nearly “Jackaroo”.

So the events of James Roberts’ More than Meets the Eye #15 are fresh in a lot of people’s minds. Someone, though, has noticed that there’s a certain… familiarity between those events and a story out of Transformers' past. But in this case, familiarity does not breed contempt! Come and see Obscure Transformerologist Andrew/Jhiaxus/Boltax/That Australian Guy examine the parallels between “Under Cold Blue Stars” and “All Fall Down” at 80 Page Giant!http://80pagegiant.blogspot.com/2013/03/comic-comparison-mtmte-15-and.htmlSpoiler warnings apply, of course.

So the events of James Roberts’ More than Meets the Eye #15 are fresh in a lot of people’s minds. Someone, though, has noticed that there’s a certain… familiarity between those events and a story out of Transformers' past. But in this case, familiarity does not breed contempt! Come and see Obscure Transformerologist Andrew/Jhiaxus/Boltax/That Australian Guy examine the parallels between “Under Cold Blue Stars” and “All Fall Down” at 80 Page Giant!

http://80pagegiant.blogspot.com/2013/03/comic-comparison-mtmte-15-and.html

Spoiler warnings apply, of course.

Having picked up a bunch of different “toy comics” over the years, I noticed that DC’s licensed comics in the ’80s had one thing over their brethren at Marvel: the inclusion of “extras”. Text pieces often appeared in the back pages of these books to provide world-building material, usually character bios, sometimes more. Across the four issues of the Tonka Spiral Zone tie-in, these were done as memos to the U.N. Security Council, all four of which are included here. Whether the information in these memos jibes with the show itself, I don’t know - Spiral Zone has been one of the harder shows of the ’80s for me to track down.

Possibly the strangest thing about the Spiral Zone mini was that it was drawn by ex-DC Comics editorial director Carmine Infantino, the man responsible for ushering in the Silver Age Flash and “New Look” Batman. I’m not sure if it’s more or less weird than Spider-Man co-creator Steve Ditko being on Chuck Norris and the Karate Kommandos, though…