Unrealized Frank Lloyd Wright design for a Pittsburgh civic center. Scan from The Vision of Frank Lloyd Wright.

Unrealized Frank Lloyd Wright design for a Pittsburgh civic center. Scan from The Vision of Frank Lloyd Wright.

Unrealized Frank Lloyd Wright design for seacliff house off the San Francisco bay. Scan from The Vision of Frank Lloyd Wright.

Unrealized Frank Lloyd Wright design for seacliff house off the San Francisco bay. Scan from The Vision of Frank Lloyd Wright.

justinpie:

ladythatsmyskull:

Collect fat from your mom

you do not have to be a cowboy to round up fat

Series of panels from Parents’ Magazine Press’s True Comics. I, uh, don’t know if getting paid by butchers to collect fat is a thing anymore? I assume not…

justinpie:

ladythatsmyskull:

Collect fat from your mom

you do not have to be a cowboy to round up fat

Series of panels from Parents’ Magazine Press’s True Comics. I, uh, don’t know if getting paid by butchers to collect fat is a thing anymore? I assume not…

The Johnson Wax Research Tower and a research lab, part of Johnson Wax Headquarters. Located in Racine, Wisconsin, the complex was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. Don’t remember what I scanned these from.

kurtbusiek:

Tonsil dunkers all around! I’m lumpy with happy cabbage!

The final entries Kurt Busiek has posted in artist Martin Naydel’s “Talk of the Teen” series, highlighting (real? imagined?) slang used by teens of the late 1940s/early 1950s. Previous reblogs are here, here, and here.

kurtbusiek:

Flip the grip, fileboner.

Even more oldstyle teen slang! I wonder if the be-hatted blonds in the lower half are the same character…

kurtbusiek:

Two moos with goo, please.

More hep talk with the teens of the late 1940s!

kurtbusiek:

Just in case you need to talk teen.

Let’s get hep with the teenagers of 1948, everyone! Or, uh, not.

Artist Martin Naydel also created the Terrific Whatzit, a shell-less turtle with superspeed who dressed like the original Flash.

udhcmh:

Fantastic Adventures, October 1949, featuring “King of the Dinosaurs” by J.W. Pelkie. Story features Tarzan stand-in Toka in a tale of men vs. Mesozoic monsters and there’s a game of dinosaur baseball.
Pelkie is actually a pen name of Shaver Mystery promoter, flying saucer popularizer, and paranormal explorer Raymond Palmer.

DUMMY OF DEATH!
… dinosaur baseball?
The Shaver Mysteries are worth reading about if you want to feel really uncomfortable about a dead author’s mental health issues.

udhcmh:

Fantastic Adventures, October 1949, featuring “King of the Dinosaurs” by J.W. Pelkie. Story features Tarzan stand-in Toka in a tale of men vs. Mesozoic monsters and there’s a game of dinosaur baseball.

Pelkie is actually a pen name of Shaver Mystery promoter, flying saucer popularizer, and paranormal explorer Raymond Palmer.

DUMMY OF DEATH!

… dinosaur baseball?

The Shaver Mysteries are worth reading about if you want to feel really uncomfortable about a dead author’s mental health issues.

Bud Collyer, Joan Alexander, et al - The Mechanical Man Part 4
80 playsDownload

thechronologicalsuperman:

The Mechanical Man
The Adventures of Superman Radio Serial - December

The Yellow Mask returns! Yet, even more surprisingly, Clark is secretly recruited into the Espionage Division of the Secret Service – the war effort is in full swing and Superman is clearly expected by the audience and the writers alike to do his part, even if only in his civilian disguise.

Both of these elements resolve in the theft of the unconquerable Mechanical Man, a powerful robot soldier who seems to have been at least lightly influenced by the Mechanical Monsters of the earlier Fleischer cartoon. Set loose by the Mask and sent rampaging through the nation, the Mechanical Man holds the country in terror – particularly as he bores down full speed on a packed orphanage.

The radio serial, at this point, tended to avoid singular menaces for the most part. The fast-paced and densely-packed Mechanical Man is an exception – due in no small part to the return of The Yellow Mask (one of Superman’s earliest foes) – but while the comics will begin to trend towards pseudonymous villains beginning in 1942, the radio serial is still some distance from setting Superman against super-villains on a regular basis, making stories like this a welcome exception…

Sadly, the radio episode here does not actually feature Superman versus a giant robot, but I do love me some Mechanical Monsters anyway.