vgjunk:

Ad for Pro Wrestling, Famicom Disk System.

The NES version of this game was a favorite, although in practice I wasn’t very good at it.

vgjunk:

Ad for Pro Wrestling, Famicom Disk System.

The NES version of this game was a favorite, although in practice I wasn’t very good at it.

alternateworldcomics:

Seems reasonable, go on. 

This is incredible on so many levels that I can’t begin to count them.
It’s got to be public domain by now, right…?

alternateworldcomics:

Seems reasonable, go on. 

This is incredible on so many levels that I can’t begin to count them.

It’s got to be public domain by now, right…?

I never met Mark Gruenwald, but by reputation, you two strike me as having similar creative bents- either tying up old continuity or using it to springboard new plots. At the same time, Gruenwald masterminded the "Scourge of the Underworld" storyline, killing off a ton of low-level villains and, seemingly, any creative potential they might've had. It feels like there's a dissonance there? Am I missing something by mulling over this some 30 years after the fact? Anyway, would love your thoughts.

kurtbusiek:

I don’t know that I’m the best person to speak for Mark Gruenwald — but I think at some point after the Scourge storyline he reconsidered the idea, coming to the conclusion that it had been a mistake to kill of a bunch of characters he didn’t see much potential in, since other creators might see things he didn’t.

As a storyline, though, it certainly generated a lot of interest and excitement, and is doubtless pretty defensible on that front, even if the idea of cleaning house of lame characters wasn’t the best of ideas.

I liked that Mark valued the rich history of the characters and wanted to build on it. Where I disagreed with him, I think, was that he occasionally tired to be a caretaker or gardener (or even janitor) of the Marvel Universe, trying to neaten it up to make it more orderly and sensible, rather than just ignoring the bits he didn’t think worked.

For instance, I’ve been told that Mark didn’t much like the concept of the Cat People who were tangled up in Tigra’s origin. And as a result, he kept trying to fix or eliminate them, explaining away or getting rid of a concept he just didn’t care for. But as a result, he wound up writing or commissioning more pages of Cat People stories than had ever existed before he got there.

That strikes me as counterproductive — probably better to just ignore the Cat People, unless you can use their existence as the basis to build something cool and interesting and compelling.

But then, in the wake of Scourge’s bloodbath, many of the characters turned out not to be dead, or were revised by having someone else take on the identity. So it’s not as if lasting damage was done to the creative potential of those particular concepts. And Marvel did build something cool and interesting out of the Scourge idea.

So was it a good idea or not? As with anything else, it’s in the eye of the beholder. It’s fun to play around with the history of these characters, to work with all this pre-existing context and texture, rather than treating the characters and their world shallowly. If the audience likes the results, great.

On the other hand, if it just feels like continuity-spackling, then it feels like wasted potential all on its own. So you’d better get a good story out of it.

I don’t actually remember how that first Scourge thing ended, but that would be the real test: Did it end well, in something that felt like it was more than just eliminating a bunch of lame villains? If so, then it was probably worth the journey.

My own experience with the Scourge storyline extends to a) the Marvel Handbook entries for the victims and b) buying the two-part conclusion in Captain America out of curiosity long after the fact. I didn’t experience the story “in the now,” which might be part of my fascination with it - “huh, wow, all these guys dead at once? Wait, the legendary continuity king was behind it…?” So my view is kind of off-kilter - and, ah, I don’t feel I’m qualified to talk about the quality of the conclusion, because I never actually read any of the build-up. That’s the burden of coming in to the Marvel Universe through quarterbin-scrounged back issues of the Handbook and trading card biographies, I suppose… conclusions with none of the questions.

I think there was a Mark’s Remarks column where Gruenwald did a back-and-forth with Byrne on the planned use of obscure villains in She-Hulk that contains him having an epiphany similar to the later reconsideration you describe, Kurt. I’d remembered its existence before deciding to send along my question, but I was still interested in hearing your thoughts on the subject as another knighted Master of the Obscure.

Thank you very much for your time, and for entertaining my question.

isleofrangoon:

Blip embeds may still have problems, so here’s the direct link.

Are you worried about the effects of nuclear fallout on your livestock? … you are? Really? Wow. Uh… we had a joke here, but you kind of threw us off with that admission. Huh. Hoo. Yeah.

So uh… Starchibald and Sunny Jim… say things… over this series of civil defense TV spots aimed at the rural inhabitant. So… ummm… we guess you’ll learn something?

*edges away slowly*

Man, how did you guys not compare Rural Squarejaw McPuppety to Race Bannon? ‘cause that is totally Puppet Race Bannon. No wonder he took the Quest assignment.

isleofrangoon:

Safety-y the Safety Sprite survived his last encounter with the Rangoons and is out for revenge, and he’s brought a host of his Object-Lesson-Spite pals with him to do it. His secret weapon? Soapy the Germ Fighter, a pantaloons-clad six foot tall cowboy soap that appears in the bedrooms of sleeping children. For reasons of cleanliness. 

Scrub up with Starchibald, Sunny Jim and guest voices Linkara, Obscurus Lupa, Scott Summerton and a surprise mystery voice for… Soapy the Germ Fighter!

Direct link to the short as blip embeds and tumblr have been buggy lately.

monzo12782:

1951.

Somehow, this still feels way more 1930s sci-fi than 1950s. Also, that rocketship’s got to be pretty inconvenient to fly, since I’m not sure it has seats.

monzo12782:

1951.

Somehow, this still feels way more 1930s sci-fi than 1950s. Also, that rocketship’s got to be pretty inconvenient to fly, since I’m not sure it has seats.

isleofrangoon:

Post Botcon, Greg and Trent unwind with a series of confections from Botcon buddy Bill and the local Asian grocery store. New tastes, and smells, are discovered, strange unflavors found, and the secret of the enraged chicken comes to light.

Click here if the video fails to load.

monzo12782:

My final scans from the Japanese Q-Robo Transformer gag manga: a full cast photo and a color image of G1 Optimus Prime from the back cover.

monzo12782:

More from the Q-Robo Transformer gag manga.

Blackarachnia tries to help Transmetal Airazor come up with a plan to ensnare Tigatron. It fails!

Unicron arrives! Optimus Primal jumps in, to… try and eat his banana-shaped horns. Well, that’s just prime…

So, returning to Transformers Latin: the '80s TF cartoon introduced a female counterpart-slash-love-interest to Optimus Prime named Elita One. Her name's obviously based off of his, but it's not particularly Latin-y. Can you think of a better Latinate(?) name/word combo that would evoke "female Optimus Prime equivalent"?

benito-cereno:

You’re right that Elita One is not particularly Latin-y. “Elita,” as far as I can tell, is not a form that exists in Latin, nor is it a form of another existing word. The seemingly obvious source for the name Elita is the French word elite, which is a derived form from the Latin participle electus, or “chosen,” from the verb eligere, “to choose.”

So, I mean, theoretically, you could make the name Electa, but it doesn’t have quite the connotation in Latin that elite does in French and English.

Other names that would be comparable to the name “Optimus Prime” (“first and best”) could be:

Maxima (the greatest)

Summa (the highest)

Suprema (the highest/supreme—part of me would be tempted to give her a name like Suprema Lex, meaning “supreme law,” from the maxim from Cicero’s De Legibus 3.3.8, “salus populi suprema lex esto”: “Let the safety of the people be the highest law.”)

Optima (the best), of course, but a little on the nose

Regina (queen)

Imperatrix (empress)

Mmmm, I dunno what else.

As for your second word, I dunno. “Prime” is about it for English-derived words meaning “first.” If you want something with the same or similar meter to the name Optimus Prime, I think One is an okay second part of the name.

Maxima One? That’s not so bad.