In 1993, Topps Comics relaunched Jack Kirby’s Silver Star as a miniseries under the auspices of writer Kurt Busiek and artist James W. Fry. Though the series was canned after only one issue, Busiek has revealed that he planned to pit the hero against an army of 1,000 supervillains - many of whom he and Fry managed to conceive, reportedly reaching somewhere in the upper 800s before the ax fell. Here is a two-page spread from that first issue, showcasing just a few members (relatively speaking) of that planned awesome army of evil.
While I’m amused by the flying catwoman - who I’m pretty sure Busiek has said is actually named Kittyhawk - take a closer look at the pink blob to the left of the Lightning Lady. Yes, Silver Star just barely avoided the terrible might of a Barney the Dinosaur/Godzilla crossbreed! Oh, the horrors…
Don’t fret too much over Busiek and Fry’s seemingly wasted efforts, though; apparently a number of their unused ideas ended up in Astro City. Whether any of the characters here are immediate predecessors to Astro City villains, though, I couldn’t say.

In 1993, Topps Comics relaunched Jack Kirby’s Silver Star as a miniseries under the auspices of writer Kurt Busiek and artist James W. Fry. Though the series was canned after only one issue, Busiek has revealed that he planned to pit the hero against an army of 1,000 supervillains - many of whom he and Fry managed to conceive, reportedly reaching somewhere in the upper 800s before the ax fell. Here is a two-page spread from that first issue, showcasing just a few members (relatively speaking) of that planned awesome army of evil.

While I’m amused by the flying catwoman - who I’m pretty sure Busiek has said is actually named Kittyhawk - take a closer look at the pink blob to the left of the Lightning Lady. Yes, Silver Star just barely avoided the terrible might of a Barney the Dinosaur/Godzilla crossbreed! Oh, the horrors…

Don’t fret too much over Busiek and Fry’s seemingly wasted efforts, though; apparently a number of their unused ideas ended up in Astro City. Whether any of the characters here are immediate predecessors to Astro City villains, though, I couldn’t say.

Dear friends of Superman: please buy rock that will kill him. Love, novelty companies.
What makes this particular ad even better is that I scanned it out of a Marvel comic, though I can no longer remember what one it was. I guess if a comic publisher would take money from the guys selling “x-ray specs”, they’d take it from anybody…

Dear friends of Superman: please buy rock that will kill him. Love, novelty companies.

What makes this particular ad even better is that I scanned it out of a Marvel comic, though I can no longer remember what one it was. I guess if a comic publisher would take money from the guys selling “x-ray specs”, they’d take it from anybody…

Ōgon Bat, a golden quasi-mystical being with a skull for a head and a terrifying laugh, is considered to be Japan’s first superhero, having been created by traveling storytellers called kamishibai in the 1930s. In the 1960s, he received an anime, whose intro - not uncommonly at the time - was sung by a men’s chorus.

I seriously wonder whether he’s in the public domain by now, because there is nothing about him that is not amazing.

So it turns out that Cleveland, Ohio has its own superhero! Unfortunately, he seems to have zero regard for public property and has black, soulless pits for eyes (but Jim there doesn’t appear to have any eyes, either, so I guess that part’s okay). I can’t imagine a lot of supervillains make their way out to Cleveland, so I suppose becoming a shill for a correspondence school is one way to earn a living. Assuming they don’t take busted walls out of his paychecks. I have no idea what I scanned this out of anymore, but I think it was an early ’80s Marvel comic.

So it turns out that Cleveland, Ohio has its own superhero! Unfortunately, he seems to have zero regard for public property and has black, soulless pits for eyes (but Jim there doesn’t appear to have any eyes, either, so I guess that part’s okay). I can’t imagine a lot of supervillains make their way out to Cleveland, so I suppose becoming a shill for a correspondence school is one way to earn a living. Assuming they don’t take busted walls out of his paychecks.

I have no idea what I scanned this out of anymore, but I think it was an early ’80s Marvel comic.

And then there was that time Destro’s voice actor mentored a group of superheroic masked wrestlers, who spent most of their time fighting a chihuahua with the mind of an evil scientist.

LOS LUCHADORES!

Cross-contributed to 80 Page Giant

Defenders of Dynatron City was a LucasArts project that, as far as I can tell, was dead on arrival. It produced a handful of comics, a single animated pilot episode, and a mediocre NES game I could maybe sometimes get to the second level of. I don’t know anything about its development beyond those facts, but the reason I didn’t completely disregard the property to the dustbin of history was sparked, of all things, by childhood frustration.

As a kid living on Guam, I saw ads for the pilot’s special Fox Kids airing a few times, and got super excited because ANIMATED SUPERHEROES I’D NEVER SEEN BEFORE! However, due to the time delays and schedule shuffling inherent in watching TV on a Pacific island in the 1990s, I never actually SAW the pilot, despite looking for it in the local schedules. Many years after the fact, my memories of this annoyance led to me tracking down the show’s release on VHS tape (though I can no longer remember where I got it from).

This was probably not worth the effort, but I must admit the non-CG animation in the pilot is surprisingly nice, having been done by the same studio that animated “Heart of Ice” for Batman: The Animated Series. Plus, it was written by Bob Forward, of Beast Wars story editing fame, and features the voices of Gary Owens, Tim Curry and… Whoopi Goldberg? Huh. Anyway, you can watch the whole thing at Veoh.

http://www.veoh.com/watch/v15913870n8xzBbrm

And that, my friends, is more on Defenders of Dynatron City than has been written since 1992.

How Carmine Infantino draws The Flash! Scans from The Amazing World of Carmine Infantino.

I love the fluidity and shapes of Infantino’s work. It reminds me of Floro Dery’s in a way, and is such a contrast to Jack Kirby (who I also love), whose figures tend to be blocky and powerfully built.

That said, this proooobably isn’t that great a drawing aid…

Clark Kent is incredibly embarrassed by his own Superman outfit. ’40s-era promotional image scanned from a collection of Superman newspaper strips.

Clark Kent is incredibly embarrassed by his own Superman outfit. ’40s-era promotional image scanned from a collection of Superman newspaper strips.

Promotional sticker sheet for the late ’90s Legion of Superheroes comic.

Promotional sticker sheet for the late ’90s Legion of Superheroes comic.

ahahahaha THAT FACE

The “transforming” Wolverine Motorcycle, from Toy Biz’s 1991 X-Men line. Personal photo.

100th post!