calamityjon:

This is the worst superhero.

This PSA is apparently from 1967. From the clothing, I honestly would have pegged it as anywhere from mid-1940s to late-1950s, but two years short of the Nixon Administration? Really? … also, it only seems to have been printed in DC Comics publications. Take that as you would.
Having said that, the actual character designs and art are quite nice. Comics.org credits the artist as Sheldon Moldoff, who co-created a bunch of Batman characters (the Matt Hagen Clayface, Mr. Zero/Mr. Freeze, Bat-Mite) while ghosting under Bob Kane’s name.

calamityjon:

This is the worst superhero.

This PSA is apparently from 1967. From the clothing, I honestly would have pegged it as anywhere from mid-1940s to late-1950s, but two years short of the Nixon Administration? Really? … also, it only seems to have been printed in DC Comics publications. Take that as you would.

Having said that, the actual character designs and art are quite nice. Comics.org credits the artist as Sheldon Moldoff, who co-created a bunch of Batman characters (the Matt Hagen Clayface, Mr. Zero/Mr. Freeze, Bat-Mite) while ghosting under Bob Kane’s name.

The Melancholy Tale of Charlie Brown and Violet Gray

Anybody who knows Peanuts knows that Charlie Brown is forever pining after the Little Redhead Girl, an unseen character who he never works up the courage to speak with. The earliest years of the strip, however, featured Charlie Brown in an on-again, off-again relationship with another character - a girl named Violet, who was the first major addition to the initial cast after the strip’s start. 1953 would give her the surname Gray, a move I can only assume was intended to underscore a parallel between her and Charlie Brown by giving them both color-related last names. (Mind you, it’s only ever mentioned once, but feels significant to me in light of very few recurring characters in Peanuts actually having surnames.)

Throughout the rest of the 1950s, the two became less and less friendly. I can’t imagine there was any kind of real continuity intended by Schulz, but reading the strips in The Complete Peanuts in sequence as I have been, it becomes painfully apparent that Charlie Brown becomes more desperate to have Violet’s approval - to have her as a friend - as time wore on. In a vacuum, you wouldn’t really think anything of the individual strips, but looking for whenever the series came back to just the two of them… you feel like you’re seeing their relations fall apart piece by piece, like a seaside cliff as it is slowly eroded by the waves of the pounding surf. It might be one of the most subtly depressing things I’ve seen in comic strips.

(The pink panels come from separate strips - in chronological order, IIRC, but I didn’t think to save the dates - while the purple ones are a complete strip from 1952.)

They’re playing our song…

Promotional flier for Georgia’s “House of Anime” store, whose giant catgirl mascot will conquer Atlanta(?) with the power of lens flares. I must have bought something from House of Anime at a local convention once, because I remember also having a paper grocery bag with the catgirl’s face on it.

The flier features a prominent appearance by Lime of Saber Marionette J, but my favorite part might be the 1999-era black and white screenshot of the store’s website. Netscape Navigator! For MAC! With a FAX NUMBER on it! … although, if you look closely at the background above the screenshot, it appears House of Anime owned a for-real RV with their logo and Lina Inverse from Slayers painted on the side, which is pleasantly insane (and helps explain the poorly-composited RV on the color half).

There was a period where I was scanning what I felt were cool or weird-looking cars for a project I was working on. For some reason, I took no notes as to the particular books I scanned from, nor what the makes of the cars were. Here, then, are the results of that scattershot randomness.

More to come.

1920s Shell Oil Petrol advertisement, from the back cover to 1974’s The Twenties: An Illustrated History in Colour 1919-1929. You can see the full front and back covers here.

1920s Shell Oil Petrol advertisement, from the back cover to 1974’s The Twenties: An Illustrated History in Colour 1919-1929. You can see the full front and back covers here.

Preproduction artwork of the Selenites, moon creatures from the 1902 French film A Trip to the Moon. Art by director Georges Méliès. The Selenites strike me as looking almost Dr. Seuss-ian, honestly…
Scan from 1978’s Alien Creatures.

Preproduction artwork of the Selenites, moon creatures from the 1902 French film A Trip to the Moon. Art by director Georges Méliès. The Selenites strike me as looking almost Dr. Seuss-ian, honestly…

Scan from 1978’s Alien Creatures.

Front and back covers to 1974’s The Twenties: An Illustrated History in Colour 1919-1929, by R. J. Unstead. I don’t know what that strange yellowish discoloration is, but the book was only a dollar…

Also, I am amused by the author bio’s assertion that Unstead “is probably” the most popular historian in the English-speaking world. Have some confidence, little bio!

monzo12782:

1952. Add your own Radiohead joke.

But seriously, I love those radio-headed robots, that rocketship, and that building. I am less sure why Cats-Eye Professor X is there, though.

monzo12782:

1952. Add your own Radiohead joke.

But seriously, I love those radio-headed robots, that rocketship, and that building. I am less sure why Cats-Eye Professor X is there, though.

monzo12782:

Front and back covers to the VHS release of GoBots: Battle of the Rock Lords, starring the voices of Margot Kidder, Roddy McDowall, and Telly Savalas! Yay? Well, I do like Roddy McDowall…

Personal scan.

Cover to 1981’s Here Come the Robots, a book I entirely forgot I owned until recently. Taking center stage here is Elektro, a robot that appeared at the 1939 World’s Fair and who has been featured here before.
More to come from this at some point.

Cover to 1981’s Here Come the Robots, a book I entirely forgot I owned until recently. Taking center stage here is Elektro, a robot that appeared at the 1939 World’s Fair and who has been featured here before.

More to come from this at some point.